Aptos (831) 685-3321 | Monterey (831) 655-4939 Rx Refills
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Covid 19 Ophthalmology for Animals - June 14, 2021

We are pleased to announce that we will begin taking steps to reopen our offices to allow for face to face visits.

The safety of our clients and employees is our highest priority and we will continue to review all available CAL/OSHA and CDC recommendations as we work towards welcoming you back inside. We ask that you please be patient with us as the rules and regulations can change quickly.

Only Vaccinated people with DVM appointments will be allowed into the building at this time, and you may choose whether or not to enter the building.

In order to keep everyone safe all persons will be required to wear a face mask indoors

Our office can only accommodate one client per pet inside of our office as it will be difficult to maintain the proper distancing at all times. You will be asked to answer some questions prior to coming inside.

Allowing inside visits will periodically impact processes and wait times.

Plexiglas shields will be installed at our front desks and hepa filtration systems will be running throughout the building.

We ask that everyone maintains the social distancing practices and utilize the hand sanitizers at the front door and within the hospital.

Once again Masks will be required inside until further notice.

Medication pickups will still be curbside.

When you arrive for your appointment, you may choose to check in via phone or text.

Please do not enter the building without an escort at any time.

Thank you for your continued patience! We look forward to seeing you soon.

Retinal Diseases

What is the retina?

The retina is a thin structure in the back of the eye that contains the cells responsible for vision. These cells detect light and shadows and send signals to the brain via the optic nerve to create a recognizable image.

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retinal-disease-diagram

How will I know if my pet has a retinal issue?

Since the retina is necessary for vision, retinal problems most often manifest as either partial or complete visual deficit. The most common signs are bumping into walls and furniture, inability to fetch toys, and being easily startled. Sometimes visual problems are noted only in certain lighting conditions (i.e. light vs. dark or day vs night). In animals with only partial vision loss or in those that become blind in only one eye, it is much more difficult to detect a problem at home because animals can compensate extremely well.

If you have concerns about your pet’s vision, a detailed ophthalmic evaluation can be performed by a veterinary ophthalmologist including examination of light reflexes and vision, visualization of the fundus (retina and optic nerve), ocular ultrasound and electroretinography. The results of these diagnostic tests provide essential information regarding treatment and prognosis for your animal’s vision.

Why would my pet have a retinal problem?

Retinal disease can be confined to the eye or can be a sign of more serious illness. The retina may be affected by primary inherited or developmental abnormalities, certain infections, blood pressure, metabolic diseases, immune-mediated diseases, or degenerative changes. It is always important to try to determine the underlying cause of an animal’s retinal disease in order to determine the most appropriate therapy and prognosis. Some retinal diseases cause irreversible blindness and some can be treated with medications or surgery.

We Are Ready To Help

Request an appointment with one of our veterinarian specialists to see how we can help you and your beloved pet.

Request Appointment

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