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Covid 19 Ophthalmology for Animals - August 6, 2020

Veterinary care is an essential part of our community and we want to assure you that our hospital is open and will continue to provide services at this time. We also want to work with you and our staff to limit direct contact in order to focus on safety for everyone during this pandemic. Accordingly, we ask that you follow the below steps for the safety of all:

  • Upon arrival at the hospital, please remain in your vehicle and call us.
  • After receipt of the call, we will check you in as soon as possible from outside the hospital.
  • If you are at the hospital to pick up medication, please remain in your car outside the hospital and call the front desk. We will deliver your order to your car as quickly as possible.
  • If you are not feeling well or may be at risk of exposure to coronavirus, please ask a healthy friend or family member to transport your pet to the hospital on your behalf.
  • We will do our best to coordinate your visit from outside the hospital, including providing follow up instructions and taking payments.

Ophthalmology for Animals, Inc., we have various ways to help care for your pets without a trip or call to the hospital.

  1. Home Delivery: medications, including prescriptions and refills, can be ordered by sending us an email or text
  2. Email: your questions, concerns, prescription refills, and pictures. We will do our best to respond in a timely manner.

Our goal is to keep our essential services available to the communities we serve and be there for you and your pets. Thank you for your cooperation and for doing your part in helping to keep pets and people safe, and please don’t hesitate to call with questions.

We anticipate our phone lines will be busier than usual, and therefore, we appreciate your patience!

Retinal Diseases

What is the retina?

The retina is a thin structure in the back of the eye that contains the cells responsible for vision. These cells detect light and shadows and send signals to the brain via the optic nerve to create a recognizable image.

retinal-disease
retinal-disease-diagram

How will I know if my pet has a retinal issue?

Since the retina is necessary for vision, retinal problems most often manifest as either partial or complete visual deficit. The most common signs are bumping into walls and furniture, inability to fetch toys, and being easily startled. Sometimes visual problems are noted only in certain lighting conditions (i.e. light vs. dark or day vs night). In animals with only partial vision loss or in those that become blind in only one eye, it is much more difficult to detect a problem at home because animals can compensate extremely well.

If you have concerns about your pet’s vision, a detailed ophthalmic evaluation can be performed by a veterinary ophthalmologist including examination of light reflexes and vision, visualization of the fundus (retina and optic nerve), ocular ultrasound and electroretinography. The results of these diagnostic tests provide essential information regarding treatment and prognosis for your animal’s vision.

Why would my pet have a retinal problem?

Retinal disease can be confined to the eye or can be a sign of more serious illness. The retina may be affected by primary inherited or developmental abnormalities, certain infections, blood pressure, metabolic diseases, immune-mediated diseases, or degenerative changes. It is always important to try to determine the underlying cause of an animal’s retinal disease in order to determine the most appropriate therapy and prognosis. Some retinal diseases cause irreversible blindness and some can be treated with medications or surgery.

We Are Ready To Help

Request an appointment with one of our veterinarian specialists to see how we can help you and your beloved pet.

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